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Indigo Dye - Denim vs. Dungaree

All About Denim Source: wikipedia.org

Denim is a sturdy cotton twill textile in which the weft passes under two or more warp threads. This twill weaving produces the familiar diagonal ribbing of the denim that distinguishes it from cotton duck.

The word "denim" comes from the name of a fabric that was first made in the city of Nīmes, France, by the André family. It was originally called serge de Nīmes but the name was soon shortened to "denim."

Denim has been used in the United States since the late 18th century.

Denim was traditionally colored blue with indigo dye to make blue jeans, although "jean" formerly denoted a different, lighter, cotton fabric. The contemporary use of the word "jean" comes from the French word for Genoa, Italy (Gźnes), where the first denim trousers were made.

It is a characteristic of any indigo denim that only the warp threads are dyed, whereas the weft threads remain plain white. As a result of the warp-faced twill weaving, one side of the textile then shows the blue warp threads and the other side shows the white weft threads. This is why blue jeans are white on the inside. This type of dyeing also creates denim's fading characteristics, which are unique compared to every other textile.

It is a characteristic of any indigo denim that only the warp threads are dyed, whereas the weft threads remain plain white. As a result of the warp-faced twill weaving, one side of the textile then shows the blue warp threads and the other side shows the white weft threads. This is why blue jeans are white on the inside. This type of dyeing also creates denim's fading characteristics, which are unique compared to every other textile.

Etymology and origin

The word "denim" comes from the name of a fabric that was first made in the city of Nīmes, France, by the André family. It was originally called serge de Nīmes but the name was soon shortened to "denim."

Denim has been used in the United States since the late 18th century.

Denim was traditionally colored blue with indigo dye to make blue jeans, although "jean" formerly denoted a different, lighter, cotton fabric. The contemporary use of the word "jean" comes from the French word for Genoa, Italy (Gźnes), where the first denim trousers were made.

Dry or raw denim

Dry or raw denim (contrasted with "washed denim") is denim that is not washed after having been dyed during production.

Over time, denim will usually fade, which is considered desirable by some people. During the process of wear, fading will usually occur on those parts of the article that receive the most stress. In a pair of jeans, these parts include the upper thighs, the ankles, and the areas behind the knees.

After being made into an article of clothing, most denim articles are washed to make them softer and to reduce or eliminate shrinkage (which could cause the article to not fit properly after its owner washes it). In addition to being washed, "washed denim" is sometimes artificially distressed to produce a "worn" look. Much of the appeal of artificially distressed denim is that it resembles dry denim which has faded. In jeans made from dry denim, such fading is affected by the body of the person who wears them and by the activities of his or her daily life. This process creates what many enthusiasts feel to be a more "natural" look than the look of artificially distressed denim.

To facilitate the natural distressing process, some wearers of dry denim will abstain from washing their jeans for more than six months.

 

 
 
 
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